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EUROPEAN UNION

How long do non-EU citizens have to be present in EU to avoid losing residency status?

How long do non-EU citizens have to be present in the European Union to make sure they don’t lose the status of long-term resident? For the first time the Court of Justice of the European Union has given an answer. 

A banner publicising the 'Next Generation EU' campaign and with an EU flag
A banner publicising the 'Next Generation EU' campaign and with an EU flag fluttering near by at the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels on October 13, 2021. (Photo by Aris Oikonomou / AFP)

Being physically present in the EU for a few days in a 12-month period is enough to avoid losing permanent residency, EU judges said.

And once long-term residence is acquired, “it is not necessary for the person concerned to have his or her habitual residence or centre of interests in the European Union,” the Court has specified. 

What’s the background?

Under the EU directive entered into force in 2006, non-EU citizens can apply for long-term resident status once they have lived legally in a country of the European Union for an uninterrupted period of five years. 

To get the status, they need to have a stable source of income and meet their own needs and those of their family members without relying on social assistance. They also need to have health insurance and, if required at the national level, prove they are integrated in society, for instance by knowing the language or the fundamental principles of the country. 

Once acquired, long-term residence grants rights similar to EU citizens in terms or work, education, social security and other welfare benefits. In addition, it should make it easier to move for work or study to other EU countries, although there are still many gaps in the way the directive is applied at the national level.

The status can also be lost if the person concerned is absent from the EU for 12 consecutive months (EU countries can allow longer periods or consider exceptional circumstances). 

But what counts as presence to break the 12-month period and maintain the status? The initial directive did not specify it and only on Thursday the EU Court of Justice provided a clarification. 

Why was the clarification needed?

The case was related to a Kazakh citizen living in Austria. The head of government of the Vienna Province (Landeshauptmann von Wien) had refused his application to renew the long-term residence permit because, in the previous 5 years, he had been present in the EU territory for only a few days a year. 

He then challenged the decision with the local administrative court (Verwaltungsgericht), requesting an interpretation of the rules to the Court of Justice of the EU. 

The administrative court asked the EU Court to clarify whether any physical presence, even of a few days, would be sufficient to prevent the loss of status, or whether an EU member state could set additional conditions, such as having habitual residence or a centre of interests in the country.

And what was the ruling?

The EU Court of Justice ruled this week that “to prevent the loss of long-term resident status” it is sufficient to be present in the EU for a few days in the 12 months following the start of the absence. 

This interpretation of the directive will now have to be followed by national administrations and courts EU-wide (except in Denmark and Ireland, which have opted out from this directive. It is possible for EU countries to opt out from EU directives on justice and home affairs but not on the internal market.)

The EU judges noted that the directive “seeks to ensure the integration of third-country nationals” and since they have already “demonstrated that they are settled in that member state”, they are, in principle, “free, as are EU citizens, to travel and reside, also for longer periods, outside the territory of the European Union” without losing their status. The rule applies as long as they maintain a link with the EU, which means they are not absent for more than 12 consecutive months, the Court added. 

Steve Peers, professor of EU law, human rights law and world trade law at the University of Essex, in England, said “this is the first judgment on this aspect of the loss of status due to absence.”

Loss of EU status doesn’t mean loss of national residency

Professor Peers also explained that when a person loses EU long-term residency status, it is still possible to maintain national status, “either where they hold that status in parallel and there are not sufficient grounds to remove it, or where they are allowed to stay under national law even though they have lost the EU status.”

Of the 23 million non-EU citizens living in the European Union, more than 10 million had long-term residence in 2019, according to the EU statistical office Eurostat.

“These residents are close to acquiring citizenship in the countries where they reside” and “they have got rights to education and vocational training, social security, tax benefits and access to procedures for obtaining housing,” said Maria Luisa Castro Costaluz of Costaluz Lawyers, a law firm in Algeciras specialized in the rights of English-speaking foreigners in Spain. 

“It seems sensible that the long-term status provides to them a better profile in regards to mobility too,” she commented.

And what about for Britons covered by Withdrawal Agreement?

According to legal experts, the Court’s decision would also extend to people covered by the agreement on the UK withdrawal from the European Union. 

While the period of absences accepted for long-term residents is up to 12 months, however, under the Brexit agreement it is up to 5 years for those covered by the Withdrawal Agreement. 

“If the judgment applies by analogy, then it should follow that it should be adapted to the period of absence. So a few days in every five years,” Professor Peers said. But then he added: “Of course no one should act on this assumption until the EU court has confirmed it.” 

The article is published in cooperation with Europe Street News, a news outlet about citizens’ rights in the EU and the UK.

Member comments

  1. Hi
    Could you please explain how the T.I.E works and what it would enable me to do. In the past I had Residencia for 7 years. I own property in England and Spain and would like to know if my T.I.E card could be used just like an EU passport.
    Regards
    Andrew Wilson

  2. Hi,
    Has anyone tried going for the higher cost fibre broadband including calls? I am interested so looked at the list of 101 destinations for unlimited calls. The United Kingdom (under any name) is not listed but the footnote (2) against Sweden says that you cannot make UK calls to 44870 numbers! I guess this is a proofing error but does anyone know?

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RESIDENCY PERMITS

How many foreign nationals are granted permanent residence in Norway?

Having permanent residence means you can live and work in Norway indefinitely. Statistics from the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) have revealed how many people were granted permanent residency in 2021.

How many foreign nationals are granted permanent residence in Norway?

Recent figures from the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) have revealed how many people were granted permanent residence in Norway last year.

In 2021, 14,548 foreign nationals were granted permanent residence, meaning they can stay in Norway indefinitely and vote in local elections.

To be granted permanent residence, you will typically have to have lived in Norway for at least three years and pay an application fee of 3,800 kroner.

READ ALSO: Why your Norwegian citizenship application might be rejected and how to avoid it

British nationals made up the largest group to be issued a permanent residence permit last year. 4,814 Brits were granted permanent residence in Norway. They also had a 100 percent success rate when it came to applying.

Syrians were the next largest group of foreign nationals to granted permanent residence by immigration authorities. 2,029 Syrian citizens were given the green light to stay in Norway indefinitely by immigration authorities.

After that, Eritreans were the third-largest group. They had one of the lowest application success rates, however. Only 78 percent of applications from Eritreans were successful, and in total, 830 Eritreans were granted permanent residence.

Filipinos, Serbians, Indians, Thai nationals, Somalians, Russians and Afghans made up the rest of the top ten largest groups to be granted permanent residence.

Nationals from 88 different countries were granted permanent residence in Norway last year. However, the total number of permanent residence cards awarded was significantly lower than in 2020, when just shy of 18,000 nationals successfully applied for permanent residence.  

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